Abertoir 2014 Day One

Abertoir Day One

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The 9th Abertoir Horror Festival kicked off particularly stylishly with a remarkable remaster of Vincent Price’s 1953 classic House of Wax. In full, glorious 3D we were treated to Price’s well-known wit and some great special effects that were sure to delight modern and traditional horror fans alike. Given Abertoir’s special relationship with Price (his daughter Victoria officially named him Abertoir’s Patron Saint a few years back) this seemed an apt start to the festival.

The second film of the night was The Editor and to avoid repeating myself, please go read my review here.

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Next up was more comedy in the form of Danger 5 – an Abertoir crowd-pleaser for the past few years with its farcical team of spies attempting to track down and, as always, Kill Hitler. Thanks to midnight screenings the audience was familiar with all of series one, but the second series is actually a completely different animal, or at the very least a completely different anthropomorphic animal head. If you’ve not seen Danger 5 that will be lost on you, but don’t worry…and go watch it.

Series 2 replaces the single-episode platform of series 1 with a narrative, but without allowing the structure of it to dull the strange antics of the characters and the often even stranger surroundings. If anything this new focus on a continuous story for the group allows for even more non-sequiturs as the mission rolls along and the group are distracted by personal demons and hang ups. As part of Abertoir we were also lucky enough to be joined by one of the creators of the show – Dario Russo for a Q&A following the screening which tackled the difficulties in casting Hitler and working with partly government-funded television channels.

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The final film of the night was the ABCs of Death 2, which if you’ve followed my Celluloid Screams coverage you’ll already know that I’ve seen it and found it a huge improvement over the first instalment. As a result, I didn’t stay for this one, instead opting for a slightly earlier night and extra sleep, which as we all know is essential at festival time.

Celluloid Screams Day Three

The last day of a festival is an emotionally trying time – you’re pretty much exhausted, but have had such a lovely time you don’t want it to end. A difficult balance. Kicking off the final day were two shorts – Canis: a hard-hitting stop-motion shot that while impressive, definitely wasn’t to my taste and Emptied: a ‘based on a true story’ short about a dentist with a grudge. The first feature of the day was Suburban Gothic, from Excision’s Ricky Bates Jr. Now anyone who has heard me speak about Excision knows I’m not a fan of it at all and I can’t say I’m a huge fan of Suburban Gothic either, but it is a marked improvement. Comedy, particularly the type favoured by John Waters is clearly where Bates’ strengths lie and transporting it into a film about a haunting really, almost surprisingly, works.

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Up next was another feature introduced by Brian Yuzna – this time a film he had produced: Dagon. Ahead of the introduction a sea-themed short from the director of last year’s short film winner Angst, Piss and Drid played, which was described as what would be the result of Ingmar Bergman made a straight-up horror film. Dagon itself is an interesting film concerning a town where all the people are changing into…something, based on a HP Lovecraft story. Yuzna’s Q+A afterwards was also intriguing as he was able to discuss his role as a producer and the importance of branding in film distribution.

Following this was the short film shortcase of festival favourites Astron-6. This was downright hilarious – Astron-6 are such an inventive group who really love their subject and are therefore the best people to parody them. My favourite of their shorts has to be Inferno of the Dead, which happily, you can watch for free on their website here. Their short trailers are the kind of things you would happily watch all the way through a festival. Kennedy, Brooks and Sweeny were also on hand to answer more questions.

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The next film was probably the one that I had the most reservations about – The ABCs of Death 2. The first one was problematic due to an overuse of toilets (even though T is for Toilet is genuinely great), Nazis and some incredibly lazy film-making from some big names. The second instalment, I’m pleased to report is a far better film, with a balance of the shocking and funny. At the moment I can’t recall any of the shorts I actively hated – whereas with the first I probably had half an arm full of letters I didn’t care for. A Q+A afterwards, including special guests The Soskas via Skype mentioned that each director had been sent a manifesto warning them off certain subjects. It seems that using the first film as an experiment has resulted in learning lessons and vastly improving the second, so much so that I’m excited for the third.

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The penultimate film was the secret film and while there was a buzz around several fairly high profile films it could have been the film was nothing I’d even heard of. Asmodexia at first, seemed an appealing film, an exorcism story which had yet to feature in the line up. However, it offers very little in terms of a story that is anything different to a million other exorcism films other than a twist in the tale that takes too long to reveal itself, leaving the film generic for far too long. As an aside, the majority of people said they’d guessed the twist before it was revealed, so they didn’t even have that enjoyment out of it…which is unfortunate. Still, great to see how many people were interested in seeing a secret film as the screening was pretty full.

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So we’ve arrived at the final film – the hotly anticipated Dead Snow 2: Red or Dead. From reports before the screening I’d heard that the sequel takes all of those crazy moments from the first film and turns them up to 11 and that is certainly accurate. Backstory and build is pushed aside for more gore and impressive set pieces but it remains well-paced and doesn’t rush to each piece. The cast are engaging, particularly the American group of zombie hunters who are perhaps too keen to journey to save the day – only realising how inept they are upon their arrival. In short, it doesn’t take itself too seriously and does exactly what anyone watching it wants which is all you can ask for.

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There you have it – my complete round up of Celluloid Screams 2014. If you’ve enjoyed this please check out more of my work, follow me on Twitter (@caitlynmdowns) and also check out my joint project with Hayley (of Hayley’s Horror Reviews), Ghostface Girls (moviepilot.com/ghostfacegirls), for podcasts, videos and articles. Thanks for reading!

Celluloid Screams Day Two

CSVSaturday at Celluloid Screams kicked off with a delightful short film by Andy Stewart that displays the effects of a relationship breakdown through a series of boils and other elements of bodily decay, which is, of course exactly what you want to see a short time after breakfast. In all seriousness, Split is a very moving short with some incredible effects that really garnered some groans from a seasoned festival crowd which is pretty impressive. This was followed by Australian character study Chocolate Strawberry Vanilla which is an engaging feature that could benefit from a little more bite throughout but ends on an ultimately tragic note and separates itself from being a straightforward film in which someone in a happy profession (ice cream man in this case) has a dark side unleashed upon the world. Initial descriptions of the film led me to believe that there would be far more in terms of the protagonist taking action against his aggressors, although it is a far better film for going down the longer route of a gradual descent into violent retribution. Glenn Maynard’s performance is a real stand-out and keeps the film ticking.

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Following this were two shorts – The Stomach and Tuck Me In, the latter of which is short film in the truest sense, coming in at around 30 seconds, if that. The Stomach is an unusual, gritty short which ultimately won best short film. It is far from my favourite, but the unique take on spirit mediumship at least marks it as something more interesting than anything more straightforward. Also worth mentioning an appearance of Neil Newbon in this – last seen being kicked under a train in pre-watershed Hollyoaks. Tuck Me In, based on limited sentence horror stories taken from creepypasta is too short to leave anything more of a lasting impression than reading it online and offers nothing new. I’ll leave out Starry Eyes in this overview, as I’ve already reviewed it here.

Next up were two more shorts, Mr Dentonn and Ghost Train ahead of What We Do In The Shadows. The former I would really love to say more about, but unfortunately an influx of latecomers taking their seats for the film prevented me from seeing the film or following any of its story, which is unfortunate. Thankfully by Ghost Train the audience had settled and I was able to enjoy an authentic ghost story about a traumatic childhood event that has led two brothers down very different paths. It is a moody, grey production that has a satisfying conclusion.

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The tone of Ghost Train could not have been more different from what was to follow, with Taika Waititi and Jemaine Clement’s broad, crowd-pleasing vampire mockumentary hitting all the right notes in a dryly funny look at a group of vampires in a flat share. I’m really glad I’m getting to see this again at Abertoir as I’m sure there are jokes I’ve missed the first time around or little details that have slipped through. The film is a genuine joy to watch and proves that along with Housebound, New Zealand could be the home of more enjoyable, funny, horror films.

The last new film of the day was Spring, from the directors of Resolution, but before that there was a short called The Jigsaw, which was simple but effective in telling the story of a seemingly cursed jigsaw puzzle that would likely have legs as a feature. Moving on to Spring though – what a film! Directors Benson and Moorhead have crafted a dreamy, meandering love story with a backdrop steeped in their own original mythology that makes it impossible to see which direction it is heading in. A Q+A following the screening revealed the lengths that had been gone to in casting actors and locations in order to be both beautiful but ambiguous which really pays off in the finished product. I can’t recommend this film enough.

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Last up on Saturday night was a screening of Society – a 1980’s comment on corporate culture and societal hierarchy….or a film about the shunting….whichever way you care to look at it. This was proceeded by another Andy Stewart short – Ink, which for me, lacked the impact of Split, due to not really offering any explanation for what was happening. Still, the effects work is top notch. The Society screening was introduced by director Brian Yuzna, who was also on hand to participate in a Q+A session afterwards. Society is one of the films I’ve always heard about in terms of 80s horror and in many ways it stands up today, particularly with its themes of hierarchy. Hearing about what a potential sequel could contain was an interesting part of the Q+A, and would definitely be something I’d want to see.

There was more fun to be had at the all-nighter starting at midnight, but given a full Sunday was on the cards, it seemed like a better idea to retire to the hotel and take full advantage of the clocks moving back for more precious sleep.

Coherence

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Coherence (2013)

Director: James Ward Byrkit

Writer: James Ward Byrkit

Starring: Emily Baldoni, Nicholas Brendon and Alex Manugian

Despite its completion in 2013, I’ve only recently been able to see Coherence as part of the Abertoir Horror Festival takeover in Chapter Arts Centre for Halloween and honestly, I’m surprised I’d not heard more about it before now. This is a clever, engaging film that succeeds because it doesn’t need to remind you how clever it is at every turn. Instead, it thrusts you into a dinner party situation that begins innocently and descends into secrets, lies and recurring vices.

Married couple Mike (Brendon) and Lee (Lorene Scarfaria) are throwing a dinner party for friends during a night in which a comet is predicted to pass. In addition to the comet, tensions within the group are high, given that one guest is bringing the ex-girlfriend of Kevin (Maury Sterling) as a date, much to the discomfort of Kevin’s current girlfriend Em (Emily Baldoni). As the comet passes however, the night takes a very different turn.

It is hard to qualify Coherence as a horror in a strict sense and it probably belongs more to the sci-fi side of things, but this is not to play down some genuinely unsettling moments within the film. The characters too are introduced initially as average, middle class types and it is only as the film continues that we are introduced to their darker sides, largely through the characters themselves admitting to, or inadvertently revealing them.

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The start of the film positions the viewer within a naturalistic setting – a slightly off-focus camera moving loosely around the kitchen and dining space creates a relaxed yet dynamic feel which really contributes to the believability of the scene. The crafting of these scenes and the way we drop in and out of the action and conversations creates a feeling of a passage of time, meaning we relax into the evening along with the characters, and equally are exposed to the tension when it arises.  The naturalistic setting also contrasts well when events take a turn for the strange.

At the start of this review I mentioned that it succeeds by being a clever film that doesn’t need to remind viewers how clever it is being. Aside from one (genuinely funny) casting in-joke, the film does little to offer a nod and a wink to break the tension along with the fourth wall, choosing instead to immerse its audience within the night. The cast too is wonderfully put together and is a true ensemble, with only one character emerging as a lead in the true sense rather late on in the film.

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Coherence is a very strong entry into either the horror or sci-fi genre, with its ending packing a punch more often seen in the climax of short films and leaves you wanting more, yet ends with the knowledge that it has done enough. There are also enough clever twists and developments that I would happily watch it again and again (if only to pick up on extra potential clues). Coherence is a film that demands your concentration, but rewards you heavily for it.

Find Coherence on twitter: @coherencemovie

Starry Eyes Review

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Starry Eyes (2014)

Directors: Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer

Writers: Kevin Kolsch and Dennis Widmyer

Starring: Alex Essoe

Sometimes the best thing you can do before seeing a film is read as little about it as possible and I’d say that is certainly the case for Starry Eyes, mainly because the film frequently defies an easy classification within any sub-genre. It is also exceptionally difficult to make a comparison such as Famous Film A meets Famous Film B. Instead, Starry Eyes repeatedly switches gears, ideas and often tones, often making it a fairly difficult film to stay on board with.

Sarah (Essoe) is a troubled, struggling actress who copes with her repeated disappointments by tearing chunks out of her hair – a behaviour she keeps private from those around her. However, after yet another failed audition she is found in the bathroom by a casting agent and asked to repeat her audition while incorporating her dark impulses. Further auditions follow, but they seem to be for a far darker role than Sarah first imagined.

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First off, the central performance by Alex Essoe is strong and probably one of the main reasons for sticking with the film to the end. Her initial fragile appearance allows for a powerful transition as the film progresses – she critiques her looks in the mirror and doesn’t really seem comfortable around her ‘friends’ who live around her who seemingly exist just to put her down. Essoe however takes the whole film’s progression into stride with a confident performance for a relative newcomer.

Secondly, the way the film is put together stylistically really works with a great soundtrack and some very effective lighting techniques. Where the film fell down for me is the numerous direction changes, meaning the film ceases to be one thing or another, but without a seamless enough blend to make it completely work as a solid piece. Given a more seamless transition between the different elements the film would be much stronger, but the balance is a difficult one.

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Overall, Starry Eyes is a film with plenty of ideas and ambition that will find an audience with people looking for something with some interesting twists and turns. However, I’d liken it to a patchwork piece in which there are several convincing and impressive pieces that perhaps don’t always work together as intended.

Starry Eyes is showing at the Abertoir Horror Festival on November 16th at 12pm.

Dark Endings

THE WOMAN IN BLACK

Quick heads up – this article will be full of spoilers for the novel and both 1989 and 2012 film versions.

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The Woman in Black is probably one of the most famous horror novels out there and has even found its way onto GCSE courses and so is being steadily introduced to more and more people. Helped in no small way of course, by the monumental success of the rebooted Hammer Studio film in 2012 and the continuing legacy of the stage play. A perhaps lesser known, but much loved made-for-TV production was also brought to the screen in 1989, meaning that the story has been taken on in a variety of mediums.

Somewhat shamefully, I’d not read Susan Hill’s novel until…well, yesterday, but I really loved it and after a bit of research concerning the television version I’ve come to a conclusion. Screen just really doesn’t ‘get’ what the story is all about or how to come to a suitable ending for it. Whether the ending of the novel is too dark for producers to want to stick with (given the 2012 Woman in Black was most complained about to the BBFC regarding its 12A rating, this is probably fair) or whether they want a more spectacular climactic set piece there is always a crucial part left out and here is your first spoiler for everything: Jennet is not interested in killing whole families, yet at the end of both screen versions the whole of the Kipps/Kidds family is dead.

imagesThe reason this doesn’t work and loses sight of the core idea of the novel is that Jennet seeks revenge for her son being taken away from her and given to Alice Drabrow to care for, given that she comes from a far more respectable position within society. She is allowed some contact with her son, provided their connection is not revealed, but things take a turn for the worse when an accident occurs, resulting in the death of her son as she watches from the window of Eel Marsh House. Her malevolence is spurred on by this intense grief and she gradually seems to go mad, but also becomes increasingly ill with a condition that turns her face white and gaunt. This condition also ostracises her from the community and contributes to her death, which is somewhat poetically referred to as ‘heart failure’. Jennet does not seek to kill children because she wants children dead – she does it to tear families apart. Within the confines of the book her haunting of Arthur continues long past his departure from the house as she is able to isolate him by killing his wife and young son, leaving him to deal with the same grief that she endured and thus, continuing a cycle of grief and anger.

Now, I get that the ending of the book is pretty damn traumatic considering it concerns the violent death of a baby after it is thrown from a horse carriage, but surely there must be something between the schmaltzy family-reuniting Hammer version and the whole family dies via tree crushing as both remove that essential element of revenge, which is to have someone live within an unbearable situation. Death ends every part of that story until someone else has to go to Eel Marsh House and pretty soon people are going to avoid it completely so Jennet will have no more revenge. The strategic stripping of everything Arthur has is what continues to disturb his sleep even though he has never returned to the house or even seen the woman in person again. It is even highlighted to some degree in Spider’s close call in the marsh – an indication that Jennet is out to hurt anything that Arthur forms a bond with.

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I’ll come out in support of the screen versions in some ways though in that they elevate certain moments in the book. Here I’m mostly referencing the TV version where Jennet appears floating over Arthur’s bed during the night – in the book there’s maybe a sentence given over to him seeing the woman above him. On screen, the moment is turned into a genuinely unsettling, if slightly dated memorable moment. Hammer’s 2012 version too has a few good moments but is dragged down by increasingly loud scares as opposed to anything substantially creepy. However, they also shy away from venturing too far into Jennet’s physical illness that changes her appearance, which I’d consider to be a pretty important element of the story.

What I’d say is key here though in the treatment of the ghost story in film is that ghosts are often treated as lighter, softer fare and more suitable for a few generations to see together. As a result, it becomes increasingly unlikely that a genuinely tragic end can play out given that the 12A and even sometimes 15 shy away from downbeat endings. The lack of violence required in the telling of a ghost story tends to keep it at the lower end of the ratings system whereas things like demons, serial killers and other beasts end up being allowed endings where there is no hope and everything is destroyed. I’m not suggesting that every ghost story should have this level of tragedy at its close, but for The Woman in Black, it seems only right to retain the central point of revenge as a damaging and damning entity stronger than any ghost.

Thanks for reading! As always I’m on Twitter @caitlynmdowns

The Strange Case of UK Distribution

Recently I’ve been struck by just how much a horror film changes from its showing at a horror festival to its arrival on a UK supermarket shelf, not in content but through its cover art. Now, it could be said that with the rise of VOD platforms that cover art is becoming less and less important with apps offering tailored lists to users of what to watch next rather than offering interesting covers to entice audiences. While the online viewing experience is no doubt a far easier option and offers film’s exposure to a far wider audience, I feel like it would be a sad thing to lose out on genuinely inventive designs to accompany often very inventive horror films.

It is this ease of access though that I feel is contributing to a decline in cover art. I’ve found myself that the majority of my DVD buying is now done in the supermarket, rather than paying out for postage costs for online specialists or even travel to a genuine media shop like HMV. Of course, in order to gain purchase in a supermarket – that most general of shops, everything must become comparable to something else in the hopes of attracting people to it. Perhaps the most obvious example of this, to me anyway, is Wither. Yes, the film is pretty much a direct homage to Evil Dead, and honestly, a pretty decent one. However, is there really any need for the cover art to be so different in the UK and US?

I mean, US cover art – pretty nifty looking scary demon:

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UK cover art….really, really familiar:

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So, you take the colour scheme of the Evil Dead remake and use the template of The Cabin in the Woods cover and hey presto! Instant success:

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Frankly, the US cover art in this instance isn’t really that much better, but it at least pretends to be its own thing. I’m also aware that having things on display in a supermarket does somewhat limit your options in horror, because yeah, there’s always the idea that some child is going to walk past and be completely traumatised by a Wither, but still, is there nothing that can be done without mashing two previous covers together? Some might say that this is more forgivable considering the debt that Wither has to the Evil Dead, but there are other, even more perplexing examples.

Take Jug Face for example. A wonderfully inventive, original film with the kind of title that really makes you lean forward. What is a Jug Face? What does it mean? I really want to find out. So, of course, when it comes to UK distribution, that fantastic title falls away and the film becomes The Pit. Now, for me a title like The Pit is too simplistic and places far too much emphasis on that as the point of the film rather than the original Jug Face. By calling it The Pit it reduces it, particularly when the back refers to it as Jug Face anyway. The cover art between these too, is problematic given the US release shows the lead female character in full trance mode, a striking image that directly relates to the film and the UK release again highlights the role of the pit. For anyone who has seen the film, it is obvious that the pit is not the main focus of the film, instead focusing on the complex moral decisions at work within the film’s community.

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On a purely aesthetic appeal there seems to be a tendency toward coding horror DVDs in black, adorning it with skulls and calling it a day while other regions enjoy cover art that is directly related to the film and also something that stands out. For example, Rob Zombie’s Lords of Salem, a colourful and inventive piece concerning a spiral into madness (although many aren’t fond, I generally am), that in the UK was represented by a plain black background and skull motif. Compare this to the US version that uses imagery from the film to create a striking piece that really attracts the eye.

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These decisions seem strange as surely the aim of selling any film is that it should stand out. By placing near identical, dark, uninspired cover art a serious disservice is being paid, particularly to lesser-known films without the budget afforded to more mainstream releases.

Hope you’ve enjoyed reading this.  Please get in touch with more baffling cover art decisions or even your favourite covers.  As always, I’m on twitter @caitlynmdowns and also on Facebook through Ghostface Girls.

The Second Death

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The Second Death is my first exposure to Argentinian ghost story films and if others are even half as strong as this, then I’d happily sit through a thousand more. For me, The Second Death does everything a really effective ghost story should do – it is cyclical, confronts very real, human emotions and concerns like belief, grief and the desire for revenge while packaging it within a uniquely creepy treatment of spirits on film.

The Second Death stars Agustina Lecouna as police detective Alba, a woman settling in a small town in an attempt to escape her own dark past who is suddenly tasked with finding an explanation for burnt corpses turning up within the town, left in a prayer position, but nothing burnt around them. Her investigation is made all the more difficult by a reluctance from the townspeople to get to the bottom of it, until child medium The Wizard arrives and she sees a chance to expose the culprits.

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The film is that most strange of genre meshes in the way it fuses the detective genre, complete with hard-boiled, troubled detective at odds with everyone else, with the ghost story, containing discussions on the ethics of mediumship and faith itself. From its opening crying baby The Second Death is an unsettling piece, underpinned by a spectacular soundscape and a meandering narrative. In many cases meandering could be considered as a criticism, but certainly not in this case. The pace of the action is exactly right and the reveal of information even extends into the credits (a fact likely missed by a few cinema goers who left as they started rolling).

It is then, a real credit to a film that tries to do so much within a relatively short run time that nothing feels unresolved or under explained and is testament to the skilful handling of director Santiago Fernández Calvete, who also creates some effective, often gothic, biblical imagery within a modern-day setting. As already mentioned the soundscape on this film is incredible, with increasingly discordant notes contributing to the suspense without ever really telegraphing a scare.

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Certainly, I’ve found myself increasingly fond of the film the more I’ve thought about it, which is always a good sign. The worst thing I think anyone can say about a film is they left the cinema without thinking about it afterwards and this definitely will not happen with The Second Death. It has given me hope that the ghost stories I love to watch can be handled in wonderful ways, providing scares without deafeningly loud noises and weaving a strong, intricate plot.

Please, if you have the chance to see it, do and totally contact me because I need someone to discuss it with!

The Understudy

ImageThis review of episode five of Inside No 9 could easily be a very short one: 5 out of 5.  So far, every episode has been able to hit a stride very quickly, seemingly never affected by the anthology format that can require a lot of character and situational awareness to be condensed into a small space of time.  Thankfully Pemberton and Shearsmith have managed to offer detailed characters without presenting caricatures so that the viewer is completely aware of that character from the very beginning without being force-fed it their motives.

This week’s episode The Understudy offered a mix, I would argue, of the previous two episodes – the dialogue-reliant Last Gasp and the disturbing tone of Tom and Gerri, to great effect.  By mixing the two this episode feels like the complete package and honestly, one of the episodes I would be most likely to show to someone unfamiliar with their work to showcase just how well they can balance comedy and horror.

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While this episode certainly leant more to the horror genre, with one effect being particularly nasty, even when viewed by a hardened horror fan, there are still some of the funniest lines from the writing duo I’ve heard.  I won’t spoil any of them here so as not to spoil the inevitable ‘mood whiplash’ that viewers will undergo during the episode. 

Again, The Understudy is confined to one location, in this case the dressing room of performer in Macbeth, the boorish Tony (Steve Pemberton) who makes loud remarks about assistant Kirstie (Rosie Cavaliero) bringing him his juice and also about hating his neighbours visiting the show.  Waiting in the wings, quite literally, is Jim (Reece Shearsmith) as Tony’s understudy patiently watching every show in case he is ever given the chance to perform the lead role.  However, Jim’s self-doubt is never far from the surface and it seems like fiancé Laura (Lyndsey Marshal) is tiring of it.

In addition to an already stellar cast, I must make mention of Julia Davis, who despite being confined to an almost cameo role in this, shines as bossy and uptight Felicity.  The wonderful thing about the episode is everyone is given at least one moment to ‘shine’ and the benefit of such a wonderful cast is that this is immensely entertaining and rewarding.

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If the comedy comes mainly from dialogue it is the sound and direction that swings toward the grim.  The sound in particular was very effective in this episode, with situations unfolding on stage made all the more bleak and disturbing by only listening to the event whereas seeing it would take too much away.  If there is one thing I really love about Pemberton and Shearsmith it is that they want their viewers to work and engage with their writing and this is further evidence of that.  The direction too does much to switch from the everyday to the macabre, often jarring the viewer with some wonderful visuals that really stay in the mind.

All in all, The Understudy may not have overtaken the initial impact of Tom and Gerri, which is still inspiring a multitude of theories (something rather confusing to me considering that all the necessary information is there in the episode and pretty simple to get), but it will remain a marker of some of Pemberton and Shearsmith’s writing: deliciously dark and disarmingly witty.