The Second Death

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The Second Death is my first exposure to Argentinian ghost story films and if others are even half as strong as this, then I’d happily sit through a thousand more. For me, The Second Death does everything a really effective ghost story should do – it is cyclical, confronts very real, human emotions and concerns like belief, grief and the desire for revenge while packaging it within a uniquely creepy treatment of spirits on film.

The Second Death stars Agustina Lecouna as police detective Alba, a woman settling in a small town in an attempt to escape her own dark past who is suddenly tasked with finding an explanation for burnt corpses turning up within the town, left in a prayer position, but nothing burnt around them. Her investigation is made all the more difficult by a reluctance from the townspeople to get to the bottom of it, until child medium The Wizard arrives and she sees a chance to expose the culprits.

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The film is that most strange of genre meshes in the way it fuses the detective genre, complete with hard-boiled, troubled detective at odds with everyone else, with the ghost story, containing discussions on the ethics of mediumship and faith itself. From its opening crying baby The Second Death is an unsettling piece, underpinned by a spectacular soundscape and a meandering narrative. In many cases meandering could be considered as a criticism, but certainly not in this case. The pace of the action is exactly right and the reveal of information even extends into the credits (a fact likely missed by a few cinema goers who left as they started rolling).

It is then, a real credit to a film that tries to do so much within a relatively short run time that nothing feels unresolved or under explained and is testament to the skilful handling of director Santiago Fernández Calvete, who also creates some effective, often gothic, biblical imagery within a modern-day setting. As already mentioned the soundscape on this film is incredible, with increasingly discordant notes contributing to the suspense without ever really telegraphing a scare.

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Certainly, I’ve found myself increasingly fond of the film the more I’ve thought about it, which is always a good sign. The worst thing I think anyone can say about a film is they left the cinema without thinking about it afterwards and this definitely will not happen with The Second Death. It has given me hope that the ghost stories I love to watch can be handled in wonderful ways, providing scares without deafeningly loud noises and weaving a strong, intricate plot.

Please, if you have the chance to see it, do and totally contact me because I need someone to discuss it with!

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