Speak No Evil

A clash of cultures and values makes for bleak viewing in this impactful film.

Synopsis: A Danish family visits a Dutch family they met on a holiday. What was supposed to be an idyllic weekend slowly starts unraveling as the Danes try to stay polite in the face of unpleasantness.

During my first watch of Speak No Evil, I realised I’d stopped taking notes about halfway through, instead becoming absorbed in the incredible discomfort that the film offers up. This is the kind of horror that you want nothing more than to look away from, yet the compelling treatment of the two opposing views held me in a vice-like grip from start to finish. Speak No Evil functions exactly like the metaphor of a frog in gradually boiling water, seemingly unaware that the temperature is rising to harmful levels. Initially, there is a cringe factor, drawn from their clashing values and while the film hints from the very beginning at something far more sinister, it does excellent (and torturous) work in drawing that out until the very end.

When Bjørn (Morten Burian) and wife Louise (Sidsel Siem Koch) meet Patrick (Fedja van Huêt) and Karin (Karina Smulders) on holiday, they assume they won’t meet them again, initially writing off offers to visit as nothing more than politeness. However, Patrick and Karin are keen to have them visit and eventually a letter prompts Bjørn and Louise, along with daughter Agnes (Liva Forsberg) to leave Denmark and go stay with them. As the weekend progresses, so do the clashes between their ways of life, causing issues between all concerned.

Fear of ‘the other’ in horror is nothing new, whether that other comes in human or more overtly monstrous form. Speak No Evil finds its monsters in a domestic space and is all the more horrific for it. Disagreements about food, public displays of affection and raising children are all dialled up to squirm-inducingly uncomfortable levels. Sections of Speak No Evil feel ripped from scaremongering tabloid pages – approaching satirical levels of ‘stranger danger’ that the film pays off in its most distressing scenes. This isn’t to say that director Christian Tafdrup is taking a conservative viewpoint, however – the film feels closer to lampooning those views in its taking events to the extreme than it does comfortably sitting within them.

Boredom and restraint loom like a spectre over the film, with Bjørn viewing their new acquaintances as more exciting than a life he’s fallen into a rut with. His intrigue about them and a clear dissatisfaction with his own life drive him perhaps even more than the politeness that the film otherwise seizes upon. The dry civility with which they live their lives leaves him open to the more expressive, louder inclinations of their hosts. Louise is more under the microscope of the hosts, especially as she is more vocal in her opposition to them. A particularly nervy scene sees Patrick challenge her on her vegetarianism by drawing her on her hypocrisy of eating fish yet refusing meat. We are invited to view the Danish couple as complacent in their middle-class status, paying lip service to environmental concerns but prioritising their own comfort.

Meanwhile, the Dutch couple, despite their initially friendly hospitality is characterised by emotional outbursts. Patrick’s confrontational nature is terrifying, whether it comes in the form of shouting or quieter tearing down. The casting is excellent here, as are the decisions made around the use of language. Some elements are not subtitled, offering a way for both couples to confer without letting the other side in on details. A dramatic score is in place from the very start – it unnerves even when the action feels static and supposedly safe, consistently placing the viewer on edge. This sense that brutality may be around the corner never lifts. In horror, a jump scare or act of violence operates as a release of energy – here that release is denied, culminating in a conclusion that is represented in coldly hollow terms.

Gripping and uncomfortable throughout, Christian Tafdrup’s Speak No Evil may be the meanest film of the year.

4 out of 5 stars

4 out of 5 stars

Speak No Evil is now streaming on Shudder.

Who Invited Them

Social mobility comes with a hefty cost in Duncan Birmingham’s sharp thriller.

Synopsis: Adam and Margo’s housewarming party is a success. One couple linger after the other guests, revealing themselves to be wealthy neighbors. As one night cap leads to another, Adam and Margo suspect their new friends are duplicitous strangers.

That houses retain the memories and events from what has happened within them is pretty common ground in horror films, usually in the form of a haunting. Who Invited Them finds a space between a haunting and a home invasion, with the home and the people in them taking on an uncomfortable edge. Adam (Ryan Hansen) and Margo (Melissa Tang) are settling into their new home – a home they have previously thought out of their reach. “A house is only as good as the people who fill it,” is offered by way of a toast – with an underlying, sinister indication that those who do not belong can sour it. Whether this statement applies to Adam and Margo, or their unwanted visitors is a concept that the film probes repeatedly.

A line of dark humour runs throughout the film, whether that’s in stark cuts to horrific scenes as characters correct themselves on story details or the interplay between the four characters flips from good-natured to increasingly confrontational. The entire cast is excellent, with Tom (Timothy Granaderos) and Sasha (Perry Mattfeld) initially presented as affable and enthusiastic. Their enthusiasm remains even as their behaviour takes a darker turn, offering quips and asides that add to how watchable the film is, balancing dark ideas with genuinely funny moments.

Adam and Margo are pitched as characters so open to flattery that it places them at risk. Adam’s desire to fully embrace his position in the new house is tied to his ideas of self-esteem. His assertion that they ‘deserve’ this new home and the status it brings dominates his other behaviours and causes him to ignore the discomfort of both Margo and their son Dylan (Kalo Moss). Handwaving their concerns as a case of ‘new house jitters’, his aspirations further an already visible distance between the family. This makes Margo all the more open to the flattery that Sasha offers about her ‘previous life’ as a performer in a band. Due to a lack of communication and different ideas, the pair become increasingly prone to manipulation.

Coming in at around 80 minutes, this is an excellent example of a film finding the ideal time in which to tell the story. With the action largely set in one location, it would be easy to try and overstuff outside elements, but the charisma of the cast is enough to support the relatively simple story. Some will find the direction it heads in to be unsurprising, but the journey is satisfying nonetheless.

Strong performances elevate this thriller in which dark secrets lie beneath a veneer of showy surroundings.

3.5 out of 5 stars

3.5 out of 5 stars

Who Invited Them is available to watch on Shudder.

Sideworld: Terrors of the Sea

The Rubicon Films team tackle the mysteries of the deep in this documentary.

Synopsis: Director George Popov presents a voyage exploring terrifying ghostly tales of the sea and monstrous horrors from the deep.

Producing two documentaries within a year is not to be sniffed at, especially ones as rounded as both Sideworld outings. I’ve previously reviewed the Sideworld: Haunted Forests of England on the blog and thankfully, Terrors of the Sea follows in the footsteps of that production in terms of its construction and focus on smaller, easy-to-follow myths, legends and supposed encounters.

The sea is, to put it simply, terrifying. Vast and with so many elements still unknowable (or at least incredibly difficult to research) it represents many things beyond human comprehension. As the documentary itself states, the sea has often been framed as a ‘dwelling for ancient and cosmic evil’. It is no surprise then, that myths, legends and stories come to fill in the gaps of understanding, but often spark more questions than answers.

Like the haunted forests counterpart, Terrors of the Sea breaks its hauntings into sections, focusing on ghostly vessels, sea monsters, tragic sailors and mermaids. There are passing references to perhaps more well-known stories that segue into smaller tales that are given specific focus. In most, the human side of these stories is focused on: love affairs gone wrong, indifference to those in need of help and a human tendency toward violence in the face of the unknown. This again, helps in the balance for sceptical viewers, with the stories able to be understood as genuine sightings or cautionary tales developed to warn us of our own destructive tendencies.

In dealing with the more otherworldly elements the film leans into illustrations and ponders other explanations. The on-screen text draws focus, where necessary, to multiple sightings, connecting the myths to glimpses of personal experiences. Illustrations are used to highlight these stories, all supported by the calm, reflective narration of George Popov. There is less emphasis on eyewitness sightings described via voiceover but where they do appear they so much to provide a spooky atmosphere.

At just over an hour long, Terrors of the Sea arrives as another example of Rubicon Films’ short but perfectly formed illustrated documentaries.

4 out of 5 stars

4 out of 5 stars

Sideworld: Terrors of the Sea is now available on Prime Video.